Archive | September, 2015

Guest:  Ms. Margareta Wahlström, Special Representative of the Secretary-General for the Implementation of the International Strategy for Disaster Reduction.

UN Hears the Call of Cali

Posted on 16 September 2015 by Ingming Aberia

Poster’s Note: On 13-14 September 2015, the United Nations Special Representative of the Secretary-General (Ban Ki-moon) for Disaster Risk Reduction, Ms. Margareta Walhstrom, visited Tacloban City and 3 municipalities (Javier, Tanauan and Palo) in Leyte on the invitation of the Office of Civil Defense. Officials from the government (OCD, Department of Foreign Affairs, and Department of Social Welfare and Development, among others) and the United Nations Resident Coordinator in the Philippines, Mr. Ola Almgren, joined her in the 2-day Mission. On Day 2, 14 September 2015, DSWD Secretary Dinky Soliman joined the Mission which visited, among other Yolanda project areas, the Temporary Shelter Site in Cali, Tacloban City. The Mission met the representatives of Cali Temporary Shelter Association for more or less 23 minutes, from 11:25 AM to 11:44 AM.

Below are excerpts of what were discussed during the meeting, along with additional info on resettlement projects in Region 8 (annexes).

PARTICIPANTS

  • Benito Lumanog, President, Cali Temporary Shelter Association
  • Joebel Umbal, Secretary, Cali Temporary Shelter Association
  • Rubilyn Chu, Chair, Health Committee, Cali Temporary Shelter Association
  • Mariya Lagman, Tacloban City Housing and Community Development Office
  • Margareta Walhstrom, SRSG, United Nations
  • Ola Almgren, UNRC/HC, UN Philippines
  • Corazon “Dinky” Soliman, Secretary, Department of Social Welfare and Development

Note: Other Mission members and community members were also present.

DISCUSSION/PROCEEDINGS

Ms. Soliman (addressing the Mission): They have been here for 9 months, and their main concern is to have water installed in the permanent shelter, because they want the permanent shelters to have water. And they don’t think that water being delivered to them is the solution. They want to have piping to ensure that water is there. They are discussing with other temporary shelter groups in Tacloban to try to address the problem. We now ask them about livelihood.

Mr. Lumanog: Hindi kami nakakapaghanapbuhay dahil dito kami sa temporary shelter, kasi ang gusto namin malipat na kami sa permanent housing para makalabas na kami sa mga bahay naman at maghanapbuhay.

Ms. Soliman: Papano kayo nabubuhay ngayon?

Mr. Lumanog: Nabubuhay kami dito, depende sa diskarte na lang Ma’am. Kasi natutulong-tulong din kami dito. Kung sino wala, nabibigyan. Kung sino meron, sya ang nagbibigay. Nagkakaisa rin kami rito.

Ms. Soliman: Saan nila kinukuha ang hanapbuhay?

Mr. Lumanog: Minsan kasi yong iba meron sila dating trabaho at nakarekober na ang boss nila, kaya nakabalik na sila sa dati nilang trabaho. Ang iba, gaya ko, dati akong jeepney driver noon wala pang bagyo. Pero ngayon di na ako maka focus sa dating hanapbuhay kasi maraming pangangailangan ang asosasyon na kailangan kong tugunan.

Ms. Soliman (translating for the Mission): For livelihood, it’s really been difficult because we are concerned with moving to a permanent house. And moving to a permanent house would then give us the assurance, the security, that we are in a place that’s stable and resilient in terms of the structure. We have not been able to find regular livelihood. So I asked: “How do you survive?” And they said by way of helping one another. Those who have will share. Those who are in need are given help. And so I said: “But how do they get (something from—Ms. Walhstrom), yes, and he said some of us whose jobs have been revived because the bosses that they had already re-opened their businesses where they were working as employees—so that’s where they get. But for himself, he is a former driver of a public utility vehicle that we call jeepney; he is not into it anymore because he has been given the responsibility of leading the internally displaced persons. So this is like his main focus—his main work now.

Ms. Soliman (addressing Mesdames Umbal and Chu): Baka kayo ho gusto nyo rin magkwento? (I ask the women to tell their stories too.)

Ms. Chu: Noong una po walang clinic dito sa Cali, pero nagpunta dito ang Helping Hands.[1] Ang sa akin po ang hinihingi lang naming nebulizer at BP. Kasi ang problema namin dito hypertension, cough and colds, fever and diarrhea. So what I did I asked Helping Hands to help us, pero natugunan nila hindi lang nebulizer at BP, pero pati medicines. Ngayon kung ano man kailangan namin—yong mga roof namin tumutulo; pero ang Helping Hands nagbibigay sa amin ng tulong. Tapos meron din kaming gardening; kahapon nagsimula kami. Kung ano pa yong hinihingi ko karapat-dapat sa community, binibigay ng Helping Hands, sa abot ng kanilang kaya.

Ms. Soliman (translating for the Mission): I started off volunteering to address health situation. I started off by wanting to have a nebulizer and BP instrument because they had no health center. They were able to organize a clinic with the help of Helping Hands, which is an NGO, and has been providing support for their health needs. At the same time, she continues to be the leader of the committee that takes care of concerns on health. Whatever they need in relation to health concerns including ensuring that repair for their roofs are provided for by Helping Hands to the extent that they are able to help.

Ms. Chu: Sana po hinihingi namin kasi medyo matagal na, sana po matransfer na kami sa permanent site. Kasi naka move on na kami, pero hindi pa kami naka pag start.

Ms. Soliman (to the Mission): They really want to transfer to the permanent shelters now. They were able to move on, but they need to have a new start at the permanent shelter.

Ms. Walhstrom: Permanent shelter is already there … ?

Ms. Soliman: Yes.

Ms. Walhstrom: Just the lack of water.

Ms Soliman (to the community): Alam ho ninyo kung saan kayo lilipat?

Ms. Chu and Ms. Umbal: Iba, iba. Meron sa Habitat for Humanity, sa Lions, sa Ridgeview.

Ms. Soliman: Yong Ridgeview, yon ho ang NHA?

Ms. Umbal: Yes.

Ms. Soliman (to the Mission): They have 3 choices—and they know where they are—they one that was built by Habitat for Humanity, they one that was built by Lions, and the one that was built by the National Housing Authority (referred to us as Ridgeview).

Ms. Soliman (to the community): At ang problema pa rin po sa lahat ng sites ay tubig?

Ms. Umbal: Opo, tubig.

Ms. Soliman (to the Mission): In all the areas, it is still the water that is the problem.

Ms. Umbal: Sa akin naman gusto ko sana, marami kasi ang walang hanapbuhay talaga dito sa amin, pero yong asawa ko may hanapbuhay naman. Yong gusto ko lang yong iba.

Ms. Soliman: Saan ho naghahanapbuhay yong asawa nyo.

Ms. Umbal: Driver din. Sa multicab.

Ms. Soliman: May multicab kayo?

Ms. Umbal: Hindi, nag baboundary lang.

Ms. Soliman (translating for the Mission): I share the view of my colleagues but for me what is important is livelihood at this point. Livelihood for everyone. My husband is a driver of a multicab (that’s a small type of a jeepney), and I asked if they owned the multicab. She said “no,” we pay what we call here a “boundary.” (Ms. Soliman asked Ms. Umbal: Magkano po boundary; Ms. Umbal said: 500.) For a day they pay 500 to the owner and the rest is what they get as their income.

Ms. Soliman (to Ms. Umbal): Ang gasolina?

Ms. Umbal: Depende.

Mr. Lumanog: Sa driver na yon.

Ms. Soliman (to the Mission): They pay 500 to the owner and the gasoline. So whatever is left from the 500 and gasoline expense is their take home. But she also emphasized that while her husband has work, she thinks that everyone should have the opportunity to work. What she is saying is everyone should have a livelihood.

Ms. Umbal: Ang gusto ko, kung magbibigay naman lang ng livelihood, dapat sana yong panghabang buhay na talaga para walang magugutom dito sa amin.

Ms. Soliman (to the Mission): we really need to have livelihood we want to make sure that no one goes hungry here. And the livelihood will give us assurance that this is taken cared of.

Ms. Walhstrom: And if people don’t have jobs is it because of transportation …

Ms. Soliman: Wala ho ba kayong hanapbuhay o empleyo dahil ba sa mahirap lumabas dito, mahirap ang sasakyan, o ano ba ang mga dahilan kung bakit nahihirapan kayo magkaroon ng hanapbuhay?

Mr. Lumanog: Kasi Ma’am mahal din ang pamasahe at kulang ko talaga kami, at saka isa pa mauubos ang oras pag nagko commute ka lang.

Ms. Soliman (to the Mission): The transportation cost is high for them, and whatever they have is not enough, including time, because it takes time to go to the city.

Ms. Soliman: Ano pa ho yong mga dahilan?

Ms. Soliman (to the Mission): I forgot to mention—they started yesterday a vegetable Gardening project.

Ms. Walhstrom: To sell?

Ms. Chu: The proceeds is for the members of the association.

Ms. Walhstrom: How many members of this community, how many families, live here.

Mr. Lumanog: 170 families. Total population is 414 persons.

Mr. Lumanog: Ang members namin according to category—children, infants, adults, etc.

Ms. Soliman (to the Mission): He is explaining that—as you can see, this is their demographics—there is an increasing number of senior citizens because what has happened is the senior citizens have joined their families here as there are no ones to take care of them. Also, he mentioned that the number of latrines has decreased as some have been destroyed. He also points out that these are the common illnesses; and he also says that the number of conditional cash transfer beneficiaries is more than 22. And he is in fact a parent leader of the cash transfer program. Because of that some beneficiaries from other sites visit him here to work with him on some program documents.

Ms. Walhstrom: In this area, which age category is highest that..?

Ms. Soliman: Dito daw ho, ano sa mga age groups ang pinakamataas na bilang na may trabaho?

Mr. Lumanog: Dito ho sa 20-59 years old. Kasi yong iba mga pamilyado na rin, ang iba nag-aaral, yong iba rito may hanap buhay din.

Ms. Soliman (to the Mission): He is saying that of those aged 20-59, about 25 percent of them has livelihood.

Mr. Lumanog: Dahil sa tulong din ng mga INGOs, nabawasbawasan din ang mga tambay.

Ms. Soliman: Ano ho ang mga livelihood na naitulong nga mga NGOs?

Mr. Lumanog: Ang IEDA[2] po.

Ms. Soliman: Ano pa po ang nagbibigay ng livelihood?

Mr. Lumanog: Helping Hands at Samaritan’s Purse. Isa pa yong Oxfam, nagbibigay din sila ng livelihood. Pero yong iba hindi nakakapagbigay kasi gusto nila grouping, ang gusto ng tao individual. Parang nabawas bawasan ang interest magtrabaho dahil grouping e. Kaya gusto nila individual na lang.

Ms. Soliman (to the Mission): He mentioned the organizations—I think you heard them—but the challenge is that the families here want to have their own business or their own livelihood. And most—all—of the NGOs require a collective effort. And so that’s why they lose interest and it doesn’t get implemented as much.

Ms. Chu: The City Government also provides livelihood. This is the job order (showing documents) scattered in different departments. This is 260 per day. Mayor Romualdez prioritized the vulnerable families as beneficiaries.

Ms. Lagman: Actually because the livelihood was difficult to sustain and the city government has a campaign to increase the coffers of the city, the Mayor hired people who would check business permit violators and penalize other violators such as jaywalkers. He hired 100 people from families in the relocation sites. He plans to increase this to 1,000 eventually.

Ms. Walhstrom: What would you say if 25 percent is gainfully employed, what was the corresponding number before Haiyan?

Ms. Soliman: Bago po mag Yolanda, lahat ng mga tao dito, lahat po ba ay may trabaho, o ilang persentahe kaya ang merong palagiang trabaho—doon sa mga pamilyang nandito po?

Mr. Lumanog: Ang karamihan dito mga fisherman.

Ms. Umbal: Pedicab driver.

Mr. Lumanog: Kami galing sa Barangay 88. Nahaluan kami ngayon, di namin alam kung ano o meron hanapbuhay nila dati. Ngayon naiipon-ipon na lang kami dito, pero 25 percent pa lang merong hanapbuhay.

Ms. Soliman: Pero tingin nyo ho ba bago mag Yolanda, lahat naman meron pinagkakakitaan.

Mr. Lumanog: Meron naman.

Ms. Umbal: Oho meron naman.

Ms. Soliman (to the Mission): Before Yolanda, all the families who are here—100 percent—have some kind of livelihood in different types—pedicab drivers, fishers, drivers, etc. But now, as he already indicated, only 25 percent of those who are here have an income. And part of it is what the City Government and other NGOs have provided.

Ms. Lagman: Actually for the past 2 years what we think there were lots of livelihood initiatives that’s why the Mayor opted for employment because it seems it’s more sustainable at this time. So they really need jobs first because there is a lot of capital that did not work so now it is back to zero.

Ms. Walhstrom: So he is trying to bring together the two ends of the system—the energy and economic revival and also the employment to go away from temporary livelihood. And people don’t want to go into collective efforts but do individual business.

Mr. Lumanog: Isa pang problema natin dito Ma’am, yong mga contractual natin—yong mga gumagawa ng permanent housing. Kasi kung minsan hindi sila naswesweldohan e. Isa rin yong dahilan kung bakit natitigil ang trabaho sa ibang community.

Ms. Soliman: He is saying another problem that he sees is that those who have been hired to be workers in the permanent housing construction which are being built by contractors—the agreement is between the National Housing Authority and the construction company—those who work under the construction company don’t get paid regularly. Often what happens is delayed and/or in a week’s time of work they are only given 4 days, which makes them demotivated. After a while, they don’t go back anymore.

 

ANNEXES

About Cali

Cali is one of 11 temporary shelter sites in Tacloban City. Please see table below:

Table 1. Completed and Ongoing Temporary Housing
Site Completed Ongoing/Future
No. of units Donor/Builder No. of Units
OC Site 1 40 Operation Compassion
OC Site 2 36 Operation Compassion
OB Sto. Niño 60 Operation Blessing
Duplex 1 149 LGU Tacloban, Operation Compassion, GAIN
Duplex 2 100 LGU Tacloban
Tagpuro 86 Operation Blessing, IOM-DSWD
Badato 69 Operation Compassion 51
CALI Area 120 IOM-DWSD 410
Yu Area 200 Operation Compassion, PDRF 240
New Kawayan 200
Bakunawa 200
TOTAL 860 1,101

Source: Tacloban City Housing and Community Development Office

Resettlement Issues

As discussed in previous government meetings, bureaucratic red tape remains a major cause of delays in implementation of resettlement projects despite Administrative Order No. 44, which fixed timelines for government agencies to act on specific tasks, such as issuance of permits.

These delays prevent the government (NHA) from disbursing the funds and releasing payments to housing contractors, who in turn incur cash flow problems that make it hard for them to pay workers on site, as discussed by Mr. Lumanog, above.

For the government transition shelters/sites, non-compliance with the SPHERE standards brought up as early as August 2014 continues to be an issue today. Lack of facilities (water, electricity, etc.) although being addressed, is also a problem in almost all permanent housing sites.

Overview: Resettlement Cluster in Region 8

Table 2. Number of Families Living in Transitional Shelter in Region 8, as of 10 August 2015
Province/City/ Municipality Housing Need (No. of Families in High-Risk Zones) No. of Families Living in Transition Shelter No. of Families that Transferred to Permanent Housing
Temporary Housing Bunk-houses Evac Center / Tents Total
Biliran 8,905 0 0 0 0
Eastern Samar 7,573 133 88 0 221
Leyte 16,199 52 1,106 0 1,158
Samar 8,900 0 475 0 475
Southern Leyte 130 0 0 0 0
Tacloban City 14,433 1,535 1,018 0 2,553 448
Total 56,140 1,720 2,687 0 4,407 448

Source: NHA, CHCDO, DSWD FO8

In Tacloban City, except for 148 families in Barangay Utap (managed by USAID/CRS), all temporary housing sites are being managed by the City Government of Tacloban. Private organizations and aid agencies, such as IOM, Operation Compassion, Operation Blessing, GAIN, PDRF, etc. helped the government in the construction of temporary housing units. Some private owners of the sites have also made available the temporary use of their properties.

According to the City Housing and Community Development Office of Tacloban City, people living in temporary housing are first in the line of families who will transfer to permanent housing. Another set of families from danger zones and bunkhouses will take their place. Within the next months, the City Government expects completion of a total of 1,101 additional temporary housing units.

The timetable set by the City Government of Tacloban for the transfer of families from temporary housing to permanent housing, based on projected completion of permanent housing units by the NHA, is as follows:[3]

Month (2015) Number of Families
July 650
September 1,309
December 850
Total 2,809

Source: City Housing and Community Development Office, Tacloban City

Due to relatively lower density, people living in temporary shelters are supposed to be in better living condition than those in bunkhouses. This is hardly the case, however, because temporary housing sites do not have adequate provision for basic utilities, such as electricity and water. On the other hand, while people living in bunkhouses have access to basic services (light, water, mobility, etc), interviews with residents showed that hygiene risks are high in their areas. In Sagkahan, for example, latrines are clogged after three days of use. The maintenance contractor (supported by Catholic Relief Services) visits the area once a month only.

Table 3. Status of NHA Permanent Housing Program Implementation as of 7 August 2015
Province/City No. of Housing Units and Status of Implementation Unmet Housing Need (Target vs Accomplishment)
Target Bid Out Accomplishment
Ongoing Substantially Completed Ready for Occupancy Total
Biliran 8,905 0 0 0 0 0 8,905
Eastern Samar 7,573 1,650 229 89 0 318 7,255
Leyte 16,199 5,299 1,093 665 136 1,894 14,305
Samar 8,900 1,000 0 0 0 0 8,900
Southern Leyte 130 0 0 0 0 0 130
Tacloban City 14,433 13,801 4,522 821 534 5,877 8,556
Total 56,140 21,750 5,844 1,575 670 8,089 48,051
As of June 2015 21,064 5,261 1,084 542 6,887
As of Aug 2015 21,750 5,844 1,575 670 8,089

Source: National Housing Authority

 

Table 4. Status of NGOs/INGOs Shelter Projects Implementation (as of May 2015)
Province/City/Municipality NGOs and International Partners with Planned, Ongoing or Completed Shelter Projects, Activities[2] Status of Project Implementation
Biliran
Almeria International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Biliran International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Cabucgayan International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Caibiran International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Naval International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Eastern Samar
Balangiga Caritas-Germany Ongoing
Christian Aid Completed
International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed (1), Ongoing (1)
Phil Children’s Ministries Network (PCMN) Ongoing
Balangkayan Catholic Relief Services (CRS) Ongoing
International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed (1), Planned (1)
Phil Children’s Ministries Network (PCMN) Ongoing
Terre des Hommes (TdH) Ongoing
Stichting Zoa Foundation (ZOA) Completed (1), Ongoing (1)
Borongan International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed (1), Ongoing (1)
Gen McArthur Catholic Relief Services (CRS) Ongoing
International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Stichting Zoa Foundation (ZOA) Completed (1), Ongoing (1)
Giporlos Ang Mananampalatayang Gumagawa, Inc. (AMG-Phil) Ongoing
Catholic Relief Services (CRS) Ongoing
International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Phil Children’s Ministries Network (PCMN) Ongoing
Stichting Zoa Foundation (ZOA) Completed
Guiuan International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) Ongoing
International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed (1), Ongoing (1)
Hernani Help from Germany Planned
Humedica Planned
International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed (1), Planned (1)
Phil Children’s Ministries Network (PCMN) Ongoing
Secours Islamique France Completed
Terre des Hommes (TdH) Ongoing
Stichting Zoa Foundation (ZOA) Completed
Lawaan Christian Aid Completed
Catholic Relief Services (CRS) Ongoing
International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed (1), Ongoing (1)
Phil Children’s Ministries Network (PCMN) Ongoing
Llorente International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Terre des Hommes (TdH) Ongoing
Maydolong International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Mercedes International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Quinapondan Catholic Relief Services (CRS) Ongoing
International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Phil Children’s Ministries Network (PCMN) Ongoing
Stichting Zoa Foundation (ZOA) Completed
Salcedo Christian Aid Completed
Catholic Relief Services (CRS) Ongoing
International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed (1), Ongoing (1)
US Peace Corps Ongoing
San Julian Stichting Zoa Foundation (ZOA) Completed
Taft International Organization for Migration (IOM) Planned
Leyte
Alang-alang Adventist Development and Relief Agency (ADRA) Ongoing
Handicap International Ongoing
International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
Save the Children Ongoing
World Vision International (WVI) Ongoing
Albuera CARE Completed
International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
NCCP-ACT Alliance Ongoing
Almeria International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Babatngon International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Barugo International Organization for Migration (IOM) Planned
Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
Baybay City International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Burauen International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Lutheran World Relief (LWR) Ongoing
Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
Calubian International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
Capoocan International Organization for Migration (IOM) Planned
Carigara Adventist Development and Relief Agency (ADRA) Completed
International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed (1), Planned (1)
Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
Dagami Adventist Development and Relief Agency (ADRA) Completed
CARE Completed
Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
World Vision International (WVI) Ongoing
Dulag Ecoweb, Inc. Completed
International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Medair Ongoing
Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
World Vision International (WVI) Ongoing
Isabel Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
Jaro Citizens’ Disaster Response Center-Diakonie Katastrophenhlife-Leyte Center for Development Ongoing
International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
GOAL Completed (1), Ongoing (1), Planned (1)
Save the Children Ongoing
Julita Medair Ongoing
Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
Kananga International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Islamic Relief Worldwide (IRW-Phil) Ongoing
La Paz CARE Completed
Medair Ongoing
Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
Leyte Adventist Development and Relief Agency (ADRA) Ongoing
International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
MacArthur Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
Matag-ob Islamic Relief Worldwide (IRW-Phil) Ongoing
World Vision International (WVI) Ongoing
Mayorga International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
Merida International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
World Vision International (WVI) Ongoing
Ormoc City CARE Completed
Christian Aid Completed
International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
World Vision International (WVI) Ongoing
Palo Catholic Relief Services (CRS) Ongoing
International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
Palompon International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Pastrana CARE Completed
Handicap International Ongoing
Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
San Isidro International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
San Miguel International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
Sta. Fe CARE Completed
Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Tabango International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
Tabontabon CARE Completed
Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
Tanauan INTERSOS Completed
International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
OXFAM Ongoing
Tolosa CARE Completed
International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
Tunga International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
Villaba International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Islamic Relief Worldwide (IRW-Phil) Ongoing
World Vision International (WVI) Ongoing
Samar
Basey Christian Aid Completed
International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) Ongoing
International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
NCCP-ACT Alliance Ongoing
Terre des Hommes (TdH) Ongoing
Marabut Christian Aid Completed
Food for the Hungry Philippines (FHP) Ongoing
International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) Ongoing
International Organization for Migration (IOM) Planned
NCCP-ACT Alliance Ongoing (1), Planned (1)
Terre des Hommes (TdH) Ongoing
Sta. Rita International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
NCCP-ACT Alliance Planned
Tacloban City Christian Aid Completed (1), Ongoing (1), Planned (1)
Catholic Relief Services (CRS) Ongoing
Humedica Ongoing
International Organization for Migration (IOM) Completed
Muslim Aid Philippines Ongoing
NCCP-ACT Alliance Planned
OXFAM Completed
Plan International Ongoing
Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Ongoing
Samaritan’s Purse Ongoing
World Vision International (WVI) Ongoing
Source: UNRCO Database

 

[1] Project Helping Hands sends teams of volunteers to provide medical care and health education for people in developing nations. Please see more here: http://projecthelpinghands.org/content/about-us

[2] http://iedarelief.org/

[3] This timetable is, from all indications, no longer tenable, as the permanent housing sites continue to have water supply problems.

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